Cooking

Shabbat Tofu

Posted by on Sep 16, 2014 in Cooking | 1 comment

Shabbat Tofu

Traditional Ashkenazi Shabbat dinner frequently involves chicken as the main course.  This makes sense in a historical context – meat was expensive, and likely families could only afford it once a week, so they saved it for the most important meal of the week.  Similar traditions arose in other cultures, like the British Sunday roast.   Eating meat is not a religious requirement; rather, the requirement is to enjoy your meal.  If you’re a vegan, I think you’re going to enjoy this Shabbat tofu a lot more!  (Probably, so will the chickens.)

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Pickled “Herring”

Posted by on Sep 12, 2014 in Cooking | 2 comments

Pickled “Herring”

This month has been going faster than I expected! This is definitely a household in which September is a big month – all of us basically went back to school in the last few weeks (my husband as a teacher, my daughter to preschool, me to community college – yay!). Plus there have been some unexpected events, and all in all it’s been a bit harder to get things going than I expected.This month has been going faster than I expected! This is definitely a household in which September is a big month – all of us basically went back to school in the last few weeks (my husband as a teacher, my daughter to preschool, me to community college – yay!). Plus there have been some unexpected events, and all in all it’s been a bit harder to get things going than I expected.

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Matzoh Ball Soup

Posted by on Sep 11, 2014 in Cooking | 4 comments

Matzoh Ball Soup

Matzoh balls, or knaidlach, are a classic Ashkenazi soup dumpling.  As their name suggests they are made from matzoh, the flat bread that is eaten on Passover instead of leavened bread.  While they are certainly a traditional Passover food, it wouldn’t be unusual to see matzoh ball soup on the menu on any major Jewish holiday.  I don’t think I am wrong in saying it is one of the more beloved foods in the Jewish arsenal.

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Holishkes

Posted by on Sep 9, 2014 in Cooking | 4 comments

Holishkes

Today I have veganized stuffed cabbage, known in Yiddish as holishkes.  Interestingly, this is one of the few Ashkenazi dishes that has a direct Sephardi counterpart.  It is also a dish that is common in most of Eastern Europe and parts of North Africa.  While most of the variations involve rice, ground meat, and a tomato sauce, you could easily tell them apart by flavor.

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Deli Potato Salad

Posted by on Sep 8, 2014 in Cooking | 2 comments

Deli Potato Salad

Ah, potato salad.  Not, perhaps, iconically Jewish, but an indispensable part of  a delicatessen menu.  When did delicatessen and Judaism become inexorably linked?  The history of Jewish delis goes back as far as the late 1800s, in New York; becoming quite common in the 1920s and 1930s.  Some iconic delis like Katz’s in New York and Cantor’s in Los Angeles have been around since the very beginning; now they share space with many newer, but no less delicious, delis.  Most are centered in New York and Los Angeles, but you can find Jewish-style deli all over the United States.  Heck, I’ve even eaten at a Jewish-style deli in Texas.  (They served fried pickles).

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Fauxshmak

Posted by on Sep 5, 2014 in Cooking | 2 comments

Fauxshmak

Forshmak is a traditional Jewish “salad” of chopped herring.  The Yiddish word forshmak roughly translates to “appetizer”, which gives you a sense that this was a fairly common dish.  While recipes vary from family to family, forshmak general includes a few key ingredients: salted herring, boiled egg, green apple, and onion.  For the vegan version I subbed eggplant for herring and tofu and The Vegg for the egg.

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